CARE HOMES

Just one of our many success stories was resident Pat. She joined her first TBT session seeming unsettled and agitated. But when the children arrived, her demeanour changed. She didn’t remember us, but our little community got to know and became responsive to her. Week by week, Pat became increasingly relaxed even dancing with a mum, batting balloons and waving the parachute.

Getting involved with TBT provides opportunities like this one for all residents, as well as many benefits for the care workforce, please take a look at just some of them:

“Pat started TBT unsettled and agitated but when the children arrived, her demeanour changed. She didn’t remember us, but our little community got to know and became responsive to her. Week by week, Pat became increasingly relaxed even dancing with a mum, batting balloons and waving the parachute.”

residents’ benefits

Here are some of the ways in which the residents can benefit from engaging with TBT:

Socialising

Intergenerational relationships and bonds with children
Time for chatting with parents

Physical movement

Copying actions to nursery rhymes
Opportunity to dance with children and parents
Playing with children and their bubbles and balloons

Reminiscence

Handmade bag covered in pockets from the past containing old items
Encouraged to share their own stories and experiences
Sessions are reminiscent of experiences with their own children/grandchildren

Cognitive challenge

Recalling words to nursery rhymes
Participating in the interactive story

Responsive

Sessions are influenced by those participating
Storytellers and families grow in their knowledge of residents, drawing on their experiences week on week

Cognitive challenge

Recalling words to nursery rhymes
Participating in the interactive story

Workforce Benefits

Here are some of the ways in which families can benefit from engåaging with TBT:

Witness residents “more themselves”, interacting with children and participating in sessions, helps their understanding of and care for them.

Can learn from the content, structure and leader of the group about how to engage intergenerational groups for the benefit of their residents.

TBT sessions are entirely run by the Storyteller so there is no extra work for staff.

tbt activities

Here are some of the ways in which families can benefit from engåaging with TBT:

Before Covid, TBT delivered intergenerational storytelling groups in care homes. But this isn’t always going to be possible and we can’t let physical restrictions stop the joy and life of being family together. And so now there are different activities available such as pen-pal style craft, Zoom sessions and outdoor groups. The activity available may vary from week to week depending on how practicable it is to be in close physical proximity with your residents but you can be certain that it will be high-quality and worthwhile.

Each week, during term time, TBT has a storytelling theme (such as Water or Transport or Safari) and a bible-based truth (such as I am Loved or I am Special or I am Welcome). Our Storytellers use a special bag covered in pockets and full of reminiscent props to bring these themes and truths to life and make the activity for the week as creative, interactive and responsive as possible. Here’s a little more information on what to expect for each activity:

Pen-pal style craft: [drop down link]

Aim? To give residents and their carers a creative focus and an opportunity to engage with little children and their parents

How? We know that it can be difficult to think of new, accessible creative ideas and then finding and funding the resources can be even harder! We will give you ideas of what to create so that you can select the most enjoyable and appropriate option for your residents. These will range from taking photos of an afternoon tea to creating a picture of a favourite season and sharing memories with the group and so much more!  You can easily email or message pictures of resident’s creations to the TBT group and families will respond with their creations too. You can be pal-ed up with a specific family or you may decide that it is better as a group activity. Your Storyteller will be able to discuss the details with you.

 Zoom sessions: [drop down link]

Aim? To involve residents in the joy of children singing memorable nursery rhymes, stories and to help them to participate just as a grandparent would in a family activitiy.

How? The Storyteller will send around the Zoom link to the families in the group and the care home, all of whom will log on for the session which will last for approximately 45 minutes. Using our special bag, we introduce the theme by creatively greeting everyone involved, we sing some beautifully recorded, memorable nursery rhymes and do all of the actions. We then listen to a short 5 minute story and have some bubbles before saying goodbye to our friends of all ages. We try to keep our sessions as interactive and responsive as possible and we love and encourage spontaneous contributions of everyone in the group both young and old!

Outdoor groups: [drop down link]

Aim? To bring the community to the care home doorstep and allow residents to watch an energetic and exciting outdoor session that will safely include residents in the fun, encouraging them to participate from the safety of their windows or a safe area in the garden.

How? The Storyteller will lead the group with a similar structure to the Zoom session above but they will make sure that it is energetic, active and loud which will be really fun for the children and thoroughly entertaining for residents who maybe watching and participating from their windows. Depending on the time of year and the weather, the group will last approximately 45 minutes but will take place come rain or shine!

 

Face to face sessions:

Aim? To give families and residents the opportunity to participate in an activity together that is beneficial for all whilst enjoying each other’s company and appreciating everyone’s contributions.

How? (The following elements can be adapted to make them as safe as possible when the restrictions allow)

10:30 – All the families meet together at the care home, we sign in and write our name labels.

10:40 – Families are taken up to the resident’s lounge, entering with a song and lots of smiles.

10:45 – The Storyteller introduces the theme and we say ‘hello’ to everyone using reminiscence and imagination

10:50 – Children pick props out of the special TBT bag and they share an item with a resident. The prop corresponds to a nursery rhyme and we sing it together.

11:00 – Story time is responsive and involving, everyone is included and encouraged by the tale of the day.

11:05 – We dance to something vintage and encourage everyone who can move in any way to join in.

11:10 – There’s time for a few more pockets, props and songs.

11:20 – We blow bubbles, encourage everyone to wave a parachute and listen to a calming song.

11:25 – We share stickers with everyone

11:30 – The care home provide a light lunch for the children, things like hummus, breadsticks, vegetable sticks, fruit and little sandwiches. And parents, residents and carers have a cup of tea and chat with each other.

12:00 – Parents leave at the right time for residents and children.

12:05 – The Storyteller makes sure that the room is in order and checks in with the carers to make sure that they’re happy with everything.

How it Works

With TBT, everyone contributes to and benefits from the success of the group making it really reasonable and worthwhile for all. Families pay to join, churches pay for resources and care homes pay to host. The exact details of this will be discussed with you when you get in touch with us as fees and funding vary from area to area. The TBT project is delivered by local churches across the UK and for a care home to get involved, , a church close by will need to be affiliated. We can help to partner church and care home so please do get in touch to discuss getting started.

 

 

 

 

What people are saying  

“I have held hundreds of babies over the years, but this is the first time I have cuddled a sleeping infant in a very long time. I’m happy as I could possibly be.”

Beryl

Resident at a care home